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Why HOV lanes were inefficient before the electric car boom

30 Jan 2023 10 mins to read
Developed as a means of traffic management and pollution reduction, HOV lanes cover thousands of miles in more than 20 states. Traditionally, HOV lanes, called traffic lanes, require a minimum amount of passenger traffic to be used during peak hours.
Why HOV lanes were inefficient before the electric car boom
Summary:They have always been considered a treat for car collector drivers, and more recently for electric car drivers who are allowed to drive on these special lanes with or without passengers.

History of HOV lanes 

History of HOV lanes

In the 1970s, HOV lanes were introduced as a reward for using a car on public roads. The idea was to reduce the number of cars on the roads, thereby reducing the pollution they create, in exchange for drivers being able to avoid worse and more frustrating traffic jams.

According to the Center for Alternative Fuels of the Department of Energy The Federal Highway Administration has allowed state transit agencies to spend federal funds on HOV lanes since the 1970s, but FHWA began encouraging HOV Funding has been limited to states with a federal mandate to reduce HOV bands.

However, shortly after the introduction of HOV lanes, research showed mixed results as to whether they actually reduce pollution levels or are effective in controlling traffic. They were considered a solution to reduce the amount of suspended particles in the air. Concentric stripes for cars have earned a reputation for being a waste of money and space. Limited number of seats. Not very well maintained.

Reconsidering HOV, a 1993 document on the use and abuse of HOV lanes, suggests that two people in a natural gas vehicle should not be considered. And bus-only lanes should be encouraged. Cars pollute the environment a lot, and that's the end of the story.

With the advent of electric vehicles, everything has changed: cars with zero emissions have appeared. This is a technological breakthrough that was not considered possible at the time of the HOV strip.

HOV lanes and electric vehicles 

HOV lanes and electric vehicles

For years, HOV lanes were reserved exclusively for large numbers of passengers, but new changes have freed up access for electric vehicles, regardless of the number of passengers. 

Under federal law, states are deciding to remove electric vehicles from HOV lane regulations and other traffic regulations such as tolls and passes, return to city limits, tunnels and bridges.

As traffic increased, so did the number of electric vehicles on the roads. Electric vehicles were initially allowed to use HOV lanes (California, Arizona, Virginia), and states found that the use of HOV lanes was more of an incentive to buy electric vehicles than expected. Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Maryland, New York, New Jersey, North Carolina, Tennessee and Utah have joined, while Connecticut, Massachusetts and Oregon will consider HOV regulations in light of the spread of electric vehicles promised to do so.

Financial incentives, such as rebates and tax breaks, are easy to predict as incentives to buy electric vehicles, while non-financial incentives can be just as strong or even more powerful, but harder to predict. Despite the initial setback, public transit lanes proved to be a way to reduce pollution on U.S. roads, as well as a way to increase the number of electric vehicles.

Before the Electric Car Boom HOV Lanes Proved to be a Costly Mistake

If you were to glance at the number of electric vehicles on the road today, it might lead one to believe that the electric car boom happened overnight. However, the reality is that the electric car industry has been moving towards where it is now for decades. Along that road, there were a few bumps and bruises, and one of them was a costly mistake that ultimately proved to be unnecessary. That mistake was the creation of HOV lanes.

The HOV Lane Concept

For those who aren't aware, HOV stands for High Occupancy Vehicle, and the concept was to create a lane on certain highways to encourage carpooling. The concept was simple enough, and it was well-intentioned. The idea was to reduce congestion on crowded highways, as well as reduce the overall carbon footprint.

HOV lanes were first introduced in the United States in the 1970s as a countermeasure to the oil crisis. Initially, they were only in place during rush hour. But as the oil crisis faded from public memory, HOV lanes became a more permanent addition to highways. Californians were among the first to experience the HOV lane in 1976.

For a while, HOV lanes served their intended purpose. The number of cars on highways during peak hours declined, and the number of people taking mass transit increased. But then, with the dawn of the electric car, things changed.

The Electric Car Boom

The electric car boom of the 2010s changed the landscape of the car industry. Sales of electric cars surged, and with that came the creation of electric car HOV lanes. At first, it seemed to make sense – a lane designated for electric vehicles would be a great way to encourage electric vehicle adoption, reduce congestion, and further reduce the carbon footprint.

However, it quickly became apparent that this was a costly mistake. These lanes had been designed for high occupancy, but electric cars often only had one or two people in them, nullifying the purpose of the HOV lane. And on top of that, HOV lanes cost millions to construct and maintain.

The Cost of HOV Lanes

When HOV lanes were first introduced, they were relatively inexpensive to construct since they were only in place during peak hours. But as they became more prevalent, they became more expensive. By the 1990s, the Federal Highway Administration mandating HOV lanes for certain highways to qualify for federal funding, and that led to a boom in construction.

One example of the cost of HOV lanes is the Katy Freeway in Texas, which was expanded twice in the 2000s to include HOV lanes. The cost totaled around $2.8 billion, and the project was plagued by problems from the start. The lanes were seldom used, and the congestion they were meant to mitigate persisted. As it turns out, building roads that don't alleviate congestion isn't the best use of taxpayer money.

The Future of HOV Lanes

The financial and practical aspects of HOV lanes are significant considerations when looking at the future of these lanes. And while they might still make sense in some areas, many places in the US are considering getting rid of them entirely. Several states, including Minnesota, Florida, and Texas, have already done so.

The push has instead been towards creating express toll lanes, which allow single drivers to pay a fee to use the lane. The fees generated from these lanes can be used to fund road maintenance and upgrades, unlike the HOV lanes, which only drain state budgets.

Key Takeaway

  • HOV lanes were first introduced in the US in the 1970s as a way to encourage carpooling and reduce congestion.
  • When the electric car boom happened in the 2010s, many cities created HOV lanes specifically for electric cars.
  • The cost of constructing and maintaining HOV lanes is enormous, and in many cases, did little to reduce congestion.
  • The future of HOV lanes is uncertain, with many cities instead opting for express toll lanes to generate revenue for road maintenance.

In conclusion, before the electric car boom, HOV lanes proved to be a costly mistake. While well-intentioned, they ultimately failed to reduce congestion and ended up costing taxpayers millions. As we look towards the future of transportation, it's essential to learn from our mistakes and create solutions that are practical, cost-effective, and beneficial to the environment.

HOV Lanes Pre-Electric Cars A Traffic Disaster Waiting to Happen

High-Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lanes were created in the 1960s to tackle the rising issue of traffic congestion in cities, primarily during rush hour. These lanes are reserved for vehicles with more than one person, and sometimes with certain types of alternative fuel or low-emission vehicles, such as hybrid and electric cars. However, the concept of HOV lanes was developed before the advent of electric cars, and with their increasing popularity these days, some key issues need to be addressed.

The Problem with HOV Lanes in Pre-Electric Cars Era

HOV lanes were introduced to reduce the number of cars on the road which in turn help reduce the traffic congestion and pollution. However, this concept was developed in a pre-electric car era and in line with the notion of carpooling, where carpool passengers would get access to these lanes, which led to fewer cars and less traffic, in theory. But now, with the advent of electric cars, many drivers are wondering whether they should switch to electric vehicles to gain access to these lanes. More specifically, many drivers who live in areas with high congestion are ditching their gas cars for electric ones with the sole aim of gaining access to the HOV lanes.

On paper, this can seem like a great initiative to promote electric cars and reduce congestion. However, ignoring the fact that these lanes were designed for multi-passenger vehicles (or low-emission vehicles to some extent), it can lead to an increased number of single-occupancy electric cars on the road, negating the original purpose of the HOV lanes. Due to this, it is important to consider how electric cars are used in conjunction with HOV lanes and think about how traffic might be affected if more electric cars were allowed to use them.

Addressing the Key Issues

There are several issues related to the increasing number of electric cars on HOV lanes that need to be addressed. These include:

  • Congestion: HOV lanes are meant to alleviate congestion, but with more single-occupancy electric cars gaining access to them, it can lead to increased traffic and congestion on these lanes, especially during peak travel hours.
  • Access: The lanes are designed for multi-passenger vehicles, and allowing single-occupancy vehicles, including electric cars, to access them can lead to resentment among other drivers who have stuck to the original carpooling concept to gain the HOV advantages.
  • Electric Vehicle (EV) Adoption: If their primary motivation for buying an EV is to access HOV lanes, the drivers may overlook the other benefits offered by these vehicles, such as their economic value, their contribution toward clean air and the environment, lower maintenance costs and more. This could slow down the rate of EV adoption and lead to negative implications for the environment.

The Future of HOV Lanes with Electric Cars

It is clear that HOV lanes need to evolve to meet the current demands of the electric car market. One possible solution to the problem is to designate separate lanes for electric cars only, where they can experience a faster commute, due to reduced traffic, while still promoting the idea of environment-friendly modes of transport.

Sales of electric cars are growing, and as more people switch to this clean mode of transportation, it only makes sense for us to build infrastructure to cater to this need. In the long run, giving electric cars access to HOV lanes along with multi-passenger vehicles could help reduce traffic congestion and promote cleaner transportation, but before that, we need to address the key issues that come along with it.

Key Takeaways

  • HOV lanes were created in the 1960s to tackle the issue of traffic congestion, primarily during rush hour by allowing multi-passenger vehicles access to the lane.
  • The need for clean energy has given rise to the popularity of electric cars, making them a good candidate for HOV lanes.
  • The concept of HOV lanes must evolve to cater to the increasing number of electric cars on the roads, specifically by dedicating EV-only lanes to reduce congestion.
  • Ignoring the fact that HOV lanes are developed primarily for multi-passenger vehicles can lead to an increased number of single-occupancy electric cars on the road, negating the original purpose of the HOV lanes.
  • Adopting EVs primarily to gain access to the HOV lane could stunt the rate of EV adoption and lead to negative implications for the environment.

It is time to address these problems before they become a traffic disaster waiting to happen. With a little innovation and creativity, HOV lanes can continue to serve their purpose and promote clean transportation for passengers without compromising on the intention of carpooling on which they were originally built.

HOV Lanes A Poor Solution for Congestion Before the Rise of EVs

HOV lanes have become a popular choice for city planners seeking to address the problem of traffic congestion in metropolitan areas. However, with the dawn of electric vehicles (EVs), it's clear that HOV lanes are not the panacea for traffic congestion that many people believe. In this article, we’ll explore the reasons why HOV lanes are a poor solution for congestion before the rise of EVs.

The dilemma with HOV lanes

HOV lanes are exclusive lanes on highways that are reserved for buses, vanpools, carpools, and motorcycles. They are intended to encourage the use of clean transportation and reduce the number of vehicles on the roads, thereby reducing congestion. Unfortunately, HOV lanes have not been entirely successful in achieving their objectives. Here are some of their drawbacks:

  • HOV lanes have low occupancy rates. Despite being designated for carpooling, the ICLEI (Local Governments for Sustainability) reports that most HOV lanes have an occupancy rate of 1.5 persons per vehicle, which is less than the recommended 2.0 persons per vehicle.
  • Construction of HOV lanes is expensive. Building exclusive lanes for HOV traffic represents tremendous capital costs that can reach millions of dollars per mile. The high expense means they are unfeasible for many cities.
  • HOV lanes create traffic issues. HOV creates challenges for congestion hotspots that already experience bottlenecks and backups. Given that it takes space to create HOV lanes, they inevitably divert space from other lanes designated for general traffic. This imbalance leads to feasibility issues.

The rise of electric vehicles

The emergence of electric vehicles is changing the transportation industry. EVs have a higher cost up-front, but they are cheaper to operate over time, quiet, cheaper to maintain, and environmentally sustainable. Notably, factories have improved the EV battery range, decreased cost, and increased charging speed, thereby making EVs more accessible to the general public.

However, HOV lanes continue to be designed for conventional vehicles that cannot operate sustainably since the HOV requirement will persist as long as we continue to promote single-occupancy car travel, carpooling is a 'Band-Aid' solution rather than a fundamental improvement to address congestion challenges.

Why traditional HOV lanes are not the way forward

Based on the current evidence, here is why HOV lanes will not help us reduce traffic congestion before the rise of EVs:

  • HOV lanes do not solve the problem of traffic congestion. HOV lanes are designed to reduce the number of vehicles on roadways, but this only addresses the symptoms of the problem rather than the root cause. The root cause of traffic congestion is that we need better urban planning and transportation of sustainable vehicles, not lanes dedicated to non-sustainable travel.
  • HOV lanes are not economically feasible. As mentioned earlier, construction and operation of HOV lanes are expensive. Due to their high costs, HOV lanes are not a plausible solution for many cities that have significant budgetary constraints and competing priorities for funding.
  • HOV lanes are not always utilized in an environmentally friendly way. Although designed to encourage carpooling and the use of public transit, HOV lanes haven't been entirely successful in achieving these goals. Many people still choose to use HOV lanes by driving cars powered by fossil fuels, such as hybrid cars, which weaken the sustainability principles of HOV lanes.

Conclusion

In conclusion, HOV lanes did not work well in addressing the problem of traffic congestion before the rise of EVs. They have been a costly and ineffective approach that has only addressed symptoms of the problem rather than the root cause. As the transportation sector is shifting to more sustainable alternatives like electric cars, HOV lanes no longer hold much promise in improving traffic in urban areas. Instead, smart, forward-thinking urban planning, additional bike lanes, pedestrian-friendly traffic management, and improved public transit will ultimately address the systemic issues associated with traffic congestion that still plagued major cities

The Inadequacy of HOV Lanes Before the Green Car Revolution

For those of you who aren’t in on the lingo, HOV lanes are those High Occupancy Vehicle lanes that were meant to encourage carpooling and ease congestion on highways. Sure, they might have been great back in the day when everyone drove SUVs and minivans, but the game has changed. With green cars becoming mainstream, HOV lanes are losing their edge and becoming increasingly irrelevant.

The Problem with HOV Lanes

HOV lanes were created in response to the increasing congestion on highways and the need to promote carpooling to reduce the number of vehicles on the road. However, with the increasing popularity of fuel-efficient green vehicles, the efficacy of HOV lanes has taken a hit. The underlying principle was good, but the very restrictions that make them effective also weaken the designated lanes’ potential.

The Inherent Problem with Promoting Carpooling

The problem with carpooling is that it’s highly dependent on the discipline and schedule of the carpoolers. By requiring a minimum number of passengers, HOV lanes assume that those carpoolers are always ready and willing to stick to a schedule. However, this is not always the case, resulting in passageways that are often underutilized. This underutilization, in turn, leads to congestion in the regular lanes, causing them to move slower.

The Rise of Green Cars and its Effect on HOV Lanes

With the rise of eco-friendly hybrid and electric cars, HOV lanes’ effectiveness has been reduced further. A carpooling car of old would have had at least two people, but nowadays, you only need a green vehicle, and you’re good. And considering the number of green vehicles on the road today, it’s easy to see how HOV lanes are becoming more and more irrelevant.

Why Green Car Owners Aren’t Carpooling Anymore

Back in the day, the only way for drivers to get in on the HOV lane goodness was to carpool with another person. However, with the advent of green cars, this is no longer the case. Owning a fuel-efficient car is now enough to give drivers access to the HOV lane. This has resulted in a drop in the number of drivers who are willing to carpool, further reducing the number of carpoolers on the roads.

Conclusion

HOV lanes might have been a great idea when they were first introduced, but like all good things, it’s time to move on. HOV lanes are becoming increasingly irrelevant and are only adding to the congestion in regular lanes. With the rise of fuel-efficient green cars, it seems that their days are numbered. It’s high time we rethink our approach to highway congestion and devise more effective solutions to address the current realities on the road.

  • HOV lanes were meant to reduce congestion and promote carpooling, but they were designed at a time when SUVs and minivans were the go-to cars on the road.
  • The efficacy of HOV lanes has been reduced further with the increasing popularity of eco-friendly green vehicles.
  • HOV lanes are underutilized, leading to congestion in regular lanes and slower traffic on highways.
  • The minimum number of passengers required in HOV lanes assumes that carpoolers are always ready and willing to stick to a schedule, which is not always the case.
  • Green cars have made carpooling less necessary, resulting in a drop in the number of carpoolers on the roads.
  • It’s time to rethink our approach to highway congestion and devise more effective solutions to address the current realities on the road.

Why HOV Lanes Were Ineffective Before the Emergence of Clean Energy Cars

In the past, High Occupancy Vehicles (HOV) lanes were supposed to be the solution to traffic congestion. Created to encourage carpooling, they were introduced to help reduce the number of vehicles on the road and move traffic along faster. However, these lanes were not as effective as they were supposed to be before the emergence of clean energy cars. Let's dive into it to understand why.

The Ineffectiveness of HOV Lanes

HOV lanes were created with the aim of reducing the number of cars on the road and traffic congestion. However, they failed to do so for several reasons, including:

  • Low occupancy rates: Many drivers did not have another person to carpool with, and therefore, they could not use the HOV lane, reducing its effectiveness.
  • No incentive for carpooling: There were no incentives for drivers to carpool, which made it difficult for them to voluntarily use the HOV lane.
  • Inefficient enforcement: The lack of enforcement of HOV lanes by law enforcement agencies meant that many drivers would still use them even when they did not meet the occupancy requirements.

The Emergence of Clean Energy Cars

The introduction of clean energy vehicles, such as electric cars, has significantly impacted the effectiveness of HOV lanes. Here's how:

  • Clean energy vehicles qualify for HOV lane access: Many states, including California and New York, allow clean energy vehicles to use the HOV lane, regardless of the number of occupants in the car.
  • Incentives for switching to clean energy cars: Incentives, such as tax credits and rebates, are provided for drivers who switch to clean energy cars. This encourages drivers to buy and use clean energy cars, which reduces the number of vehicles on the road.
  • Reduction in traffic congestion: With clean energy cars in the HOV lane, traffic congestion reduces. This is because clean energy cars are more efficient, and they emit less pollution than gasoline vehicles, which makes the HOV lane more effective.

The Key Takeaways

To summarize, HOV lanes were ineffective in reducing traffic congestion in the past for several reasons, including low occupancy rates and the lack of incentives to carpool. However, the emergence of clean energy cars has significantly impacted the effectiveness of HOV lanes. States that allow clean energy vehicles to use the HOV lane, regardless of the number of occupants in the car, have seen a reduction in traffic congestion. Incentives, such as tax credits and rebates, have also encouraged drivers to switch to clean energy cars, which further reduces the number of vehicles on the road.

Final Thoughts

In conclusion, HOV lanes were not as effective in reducing traffic congestion in the past. However, with the emergence of clean energy cars, they have become a viable solution for reducing the number of vehicles on the road and moving traffic along faster. The use of incentives and the allowance of clean energy vehicles in the HOV lane has made it a more attractive option for drivers, which results in a reduction in traffic congestion.

Before Electric Cars HOV Lanes Failed to Reduce Traffic on America Highways

When electric cars first hit the market, many saw them as the holy grail of personal transportation. Not only were they eco-friendly, but they also promised a future where we could say goodbye to traffic jams forever. One of the ways they were supposed to do this was by reducing congestion on America's highways through the implementation of HOV lanes. However, as it turns out, electric cars haven't had the impact we were hoping for when it comes to reducing traffic. In this article, we'll take a closer look at why HOV lanes have failed to make a dent in traffic problems and what we can do to fix it.

The Problem with HOV Lanes

HOV lanes are designed to prioritize certain types of vehicles, such as carpoolers or buses, over others. The idea behind this is that by incentivizing people to carpool, we could reduce the number of cars on the road and therefore alleviate congestion. For a while, this seemed to work. In the 1990s, cities like Houston and Los Angeles were implementing HOV lanes and seeing improvements in their traffic flow.

But as time went on, more and more people started using the HOV lanes. In some cases, they were using them illegally by putting a mannequin in the passenger seat or claiming that they were carpooling when they weren't. As a result, the HOV lanes became just as crowded as the regular lanes, defeating the entire purpose of having them in the first place. So what does this have to do with electric cars? Well, it turns out that they haven't been the solution we were hoping for.

Why Electric Cars Haven't Fixed the Problem

One of the reasons that electric cars were touted as the solution to traffic congestion is because they were allowed to use the HOV lanes even if they only had one person in the vehicle. The idea was that by incentivizing people to buy electric cars, we could reduce the number of gas-guzzling vehicles on the road, which would in turn reduce traffic. But unfortunately, this hasn't been the case.

For one, not enough people are buying electric cars to make a significant impact on traffic. According to the US Department of Energy, only 1.4% of new vehicles sold in 2020 were electric. That's up from 0.6% in 2012, but it's hardly a game-changer. Secondly, even if more people did start driving electric cars, it wouldn't necessarily reduce congestion. That's because, as we saw with the HOV lanes, if you give people a lane to use, they'll use it. In other words, if we started giving electric cars their own lane, it would likely become just as crowded as the other lanes.

What Can We Do to Fix It?

So if HOV lanes and electric cars aren't the solution, what can we do to reduce traffic on America's highways? Here are some ideas:

  • Invest in public transit: One of the reasons that people don't carpool or take the bus is because public transit isn't necessarily convenient. By investing in better public transit options, we could make it a more attractive alternative to driving.
  • Encourage remote working: Thanks to the pandemic, we've seen a massive shift towards remote work. If we continue to encourage this trend once the pandemic is over, it could go a long way towards reducing traffic.
  • Implement road pricing: Some cities have experimented with the idea of charging drivers a fee for using certain roads or highways during peak hours. This could discourage people from driving during rush hour and reduce congestion.

While electric cars may not be the solution to our traffic problems, there are plenty of other ideas that could work. By investing in public transit, encouraging remote work, and implementing road pricing, we can create a future where traffic is no longer a headache.

Key Takeaways

  • HOV lanes were designed to reduce traffic by incentivizing carpooling, but they've become just as crowded as the regular lanes.
  • Electric cars were seen as a solution to traffic congestion, but they haven't had a significant impact because not enough people are buying them and giving them their own lane would likely lead to congestion.
  • To reduce traffic, we need to invest in public transit, encourage remote work, and implement road pricing.

Why HOV Lanes Were a Waste of Space Before Electric Vehicles

As traffic congestion continues to get worse in urban cities, HOV lanes have become a common sight. High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lanes are defined as the lanes on highways and freeways designated for exclusive use by vehicles with two or more passengers. This means that if you’re driving alone, you cannot use the lane. But are they really worth the space they occupy on the road? Here’s why HOV lanes were a waste of space before electric vehicles.

1. HOV Lanes Were Inefficient

HOV lanes were initially introduced to encourage ride-sharing and reduce traffic congestion. In theory, this basic concept makes a lot of sense. Having fewer cars on the road means less traffic jams and less pollution. But the reality is often quite different. Studies have shown that HOV lanes were actually a waste of time for most commuters. In fact, many drivers were found to be using the lanes illegally, leading to even more congestion. Others who did comply with the rules were often stuck in traffic. In some cases, the HOV lane was so underused that it was impossible to prove that it had reduced traffic congestion at all. Clearly, the concept of HOV lanes was a good one, but their implementation was not.

2. Electric Vehicles Changed the Game

Now don’t get me wrong, HOV lanes are still not perfect, but they have definitely become more effective since the introduction of electric vehicles. The idea behind HOV lanes is to encourage people to carpool and reduce emissions. The rise of electric vehicles has made carpooling much more sustainable and convenient. In some cities, electric vehicles are even exempted from the minimum passenger requirements in HOV lanes. This has made it easier for people to share rides and reduce the number of cars on the road. Plus, it also reduces emissions and promotes a cleaner environment.

3. HOV Lanes Can Be Reused

One of the biggest problems of HOV lanes was the fact that they were usually underutilized. As a result, there was a lot of wasted space on the roads. However, with the rise of electric vehicles, the space on HOV lanes can be easily used for other purposes. For example, HOV lanes that are underused can be converted into dedicated lanes for electric vehicles. They can also be repurposed for bike lanes or other types of public transportation. This helps to make better use of the space that was previously wasted on HOV lanes, while still promoting sustainable transportation options.

Conclusion

HOV lanes were initially introduced as a way to reduce traffic congestion and promote sustainable transportation. However, their implementation was often inefficient and underused. The rise of electric vehicles has changed that, making carpooling and sharing rides more convenient and sustainable. HOV lanes may still need some improvements, but they have become a more effective solution for reducing traffic congestion and promoting sustainable transportation. Let's keep evolving our solutions in order to make our cities and modes of transportation more efficient and eco-friendly.
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27 Comments


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Electric cars are the future, and HOV lanes will be even more relevant as they become more popular.
HOV lanes were just another way to make driving more complicated.
HOV lanes before electric cars were basically ghost towns.
I don’t know, but it seems like electric cars could make HOV lanes more useful.
HOV lanes sucked before electric cars because not enough people could use them.
What’s the logic of having a lane that is only for certain cars?
HOV lanes are an interesting concept, but they need to be more practical.
With more electric cars on the road, I think we’ll see more HOV lanes being built.
benny daignault5/17/2023, 7:38:15 PM
I remember sitting in traffic while the HOV lane next to me was completely empty.
I wonder if people who drive electric cars are more likely to carpool.
lance crawshaw5/14/2023, 1:17:26 PM
I think car manufacturers should offer more incentives for people to buy electric cars.
It’s definitely frustrating to see empty HOV lanes when you’re stuck in traffic.
It’s frustrating to see empty HOV lanes when the rest of the freeway is clogged up.
arnetta comish5/11/2023, 6:50:54 PM
Electric cars have definitely made HOV lanes more efficient, but there’s still work to be done.
jovan bienvenue4/28/2023, 1:14:10 PM
I guess the argument was that it would incentivize people to carpool, but it didn’t really work out that way.

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Energy5 EV Charging solutions comprise a full range of end-to-end turnkey services for businesses. From permitting to incentive acquisition to installation, management software, and down-the-road maintenance, Energy5 streamlines the whole process every step of the way.
Address
300 W Somerdale Rd, Suite 5, Voorhees Township, NJ 08043
Email address
hello@energy5.com
Phone number
(856) 412-4645